Tag: exit planning

Exit Planning: When to start?

 

Legal matters, business strategy, and life perspectives from the mind of a non-attorney.

A few weeks ago, we sent out emails to several business owners, inviting them to attend a presentation on Exit Planning. We met our desired room capacity pretty quickly, but we did get a few responses like this:

  • “I’m not exiting my business for 3 or 4 years, I’ll attend the presentation then.”
  • “We aren’t exiting until next year. Will you be doing this again in 6 months?”

Two separate business owners made a conscious decision to delay attending this kind of presentation until their exit is at arm’s length.

As a person who is very educated on what Exit Planning is and how much work it takes, let’s just say those decisions scare the s*** out of me.

Yes, I know, there is a certain contingent of business owners who simply cannot – and will not – mentally or emotionally handle the task of planning for their exit. In fact, we even wrote a blog about it: Exit Planning: Why Do Business Owners Avoid It? Bottom line: It’s just too much for them, so they stick their heads in the sand.

Those responses we got – you know, a few weeks ago after the presentation – those felt different. To my mind, it feels like those business owners actually think it is OK to wait longer than they already have. Like, with the rational part of their brain.

They weren’t being emotional, afraid, or willfully negligent.

It seems like they were just living their reality.

If that is the case, I have failed you all miserably.

Why?

The truth is, executing an Exit Plan takes a hell of a lot longer than 6-12 months. If you wait until then to even start LEARNING about Exit Planning, you are way behind the 8 ball. You are asking for disaster. I’m not saying you are S.O.L, but I AM SAYING that you have effectively put the ball in someone else’s court and left value – i.e. MONEY – on the table.

Really?

Yep.

Okay… So how long DOES it take?

Internal Transition

First of all, did you know there are really only four (4) practical ways that you can transition a business internally?

  1. Intergenerational Transfer: The transfer of a business to direct heirs, usually children. About 50% of business owners want to exercise this option; only 30% do it successfully.
  2. Management Buyout: Owner sells all or part of the business to the company’s management team. Management uses the assets of the business to finance a significant portion of the purchase price.
  3. ESOP: Company uses borrowed funds to acquire shares from the owner and contributes the shares to a trust on behalf of the employees.
  4. Sale to Existing Partners.

Here’s the deal: If I’m going to be your Exit Planner, and you are considering an Internal Transition of any kind, I want our initial meeting to be at least 10 years prior to your exit.

You heard me. 10 years.

Why? 2 Reasons.

  1. In all likelihood, you are not just GIVING this thing away. And you want cash at closing, not a promise to pay.
  2. In all likelihood, the person(s) you are selling it to can’t afford to buy it, and wouldn’t be able to secure financing.

If you come meet with me 10 years in advance, we can create a pot of money for your successor(s). The concept is simple: Money gets bonus-ed into the pot if – and only if – they achieve predetermined objectives that help you grow the value of the business. Pick your scenario:

  • Give successor(s) $0.00, have a company worth $2,000,000. In 10 years, receive a 20 year note and a $150,000 first year payment.
  • Give successor(s) $1,000,000.00, have a company worth $3,000,000. In 10 years, receive $2,000,000 and a 10 year note for the balance.

I know which one I’d pick.

If you come meet with me 5 years in advance, we cannot do that.

If you come meet with me somewhere in between, the numbers might work. They might not. It’s anybody’s guess.

External Sale

If you’re planning to pursue a sale to a third party, I will be thrilled if you give me a 5 year runway to work with.

You see, Exit Planning is a lot like flipping a house:

If you give me 5 years, we can update everything: new hardwoods, appliances, siding, and roofing. We can check the plumbing and electrical. We can remodel the kitchen and master bedroom. Hell, we can even toss on an addition. And the best news: All of that will be done in 2-3 years, giving us the opportunity to truly pick our spot and capitalize on favorable market conditions when they are present.

If you give me 3 years, we can still make a ton of updates. The house will truly be in great shape for buyers. Only problem: you aren’t giving yourself any time to play the market. Once the house is ready, you’re going up for sale, whether it’s a buyer’s market or a seller’s market.

If you give me 1 year, we can update a handful of things and slap on a fresh coat of paint. That’s it. Smart buyers – yes most of them are smart – are going to try and poke holes to drive the price down.

I know what you’re thinking: “Yeah, remodeling makes everything look great, but it ain’t free either. Is it really worth the investment?”

  • For most of you it’s going to mean the difference between a business that sells and one that sits on the market for 2 years before getting liquidated because nobody wants it.
  • We track ROI for our clients. We’ve never had someone come out in the negative. We generally EXPECT our clients to earn at least 30% on their investments in Exit Planning by the time it’s all said and done.

Getting Started

We generally kick off the process with a complimentary “exploratory” meeting. You’ll have the opportunity to ask questions and help us understand your true desires.

Assuming all parties agree to move forward, we jump into “Benchmarking” your business.

To stick with the remodeling analogy, it’s the basic equivalent of obtaining a real estate appraisal – on steroids. Yes, we deliver you with an estimate of value based on your financials. We also take it 5 steps further. We give you insight that says, “Hey, someone is going to fall in love with this house and pay 20% more if you gut the basement clean, paint the stairwell olive green and put a giant picture of Aaron Rodgers in the family room.”

At that point, whether you hire us to gut the basement and paint the stairwell, contract it out to someone else, or ignore our advice is entirely your prerogative.

 

Exit Planning: Why do Business Owners Avoid it?

Science has proved it to be an urban myth, but it was long believed that ostriches buried their heads in the ground at the sight of approaching danger.

Thus, the phrase “You have your head in the sand”, was born. It means: “To refuse to acknowledge or deal with problems, danger, or difficulty in the hopes that they will resolve themselves on their own.”

Business owners are notorious for “burying their heads in the sand” as they near the end of their runway. But why?

When so much can be gained by sucking it up and planning for an exit, why do business owners avoid it?

In no particular order, here are several reasons:

  1. Afraid of getting old. Exiting the business represents “the end” of youth.
  2. Feel trapped. Used to a high level of income that accompanies business ownership. Afraid that they will have to take a “pay cut” in the last chapter of their lives. The tendency is to stay in the business, pulling off a heavy salary, as long as possible.
  3. Don’t know what to do next. Don’t have a purpose in life after work. Business is their identity.
  4. Afraid of being bored.
  5. Don’t want anyone to know they are planning to exit their business. They have an irrational fear that employees, customers, suppliers will leave if they find out a transition is happening. In reality, these people are already thinking about the business owner’s eventual retirement, and they would feel more comfortable if they knew the strategy for moving forward after you are gone.
  6. Have priorities that feel way more urgent than exit planning. “I don’t even have enough time in the day to run my business, how am I supposed to have time to plan for an exit”. This is the classic “saving face” excuse that many business owners are willing to voice when they don’t want to discuss their soft/emotional apprehension toward leaving the business.
  7. Misinformed and confused about what to do. In a world where most professional services have stood as pillars of industry for hundreds of years, Exit Planning is still in its infancy as a practice. It’s an incredibly confusing and very time-consuming process. And different advisors preach different things. Unfortunately, many advisors right now are taking a micro-view of “Exit Planning” that fits their personal expertise, because there is money to be made if they can play a role in an owner’s exit. For example, a financial advisor may map out a business owner’s projected retirement assets/expenses + reallocate their investment portfolio and call it “Exit Planning”. This is not Exit Planning. It is a very small piece of the much larger Exit Planning process.
  8. Genuinely don’t want to exit. They still have the drive for it. They still thoroughly enjoy what they do. Can’t even comprehend leaving in the next 10 years. This doesn’t mean they shouldn’t familiarize themselves with the Exit Planning process. There are certain concepts – particularly in the area of risk management – that all business owners should implement correctly many years before they feel “ready”. Taking some time to understand the process – to understand what buyers are looking for – can afford business owners a strategic advantage.
  9. Control issues. Some business owners are simply attached to the operations. Can’t let go, even if there are people in place, ready to assume more responsibility. If they aren’t in place, it usually is a simple process to cross-train people to assume more responsibility or hire an additional employee to assume some of the burden.
  10. Don’t understand all the options available to them. Many business owners have very misguided beliefs about the market for their business. A common mistake is to ignore a sale to employees because they “don’t have any money”. In many cases, if time is on the owner’s side, there are strategic ways of helping employees build capital.
  11. Heir-apparent (successor) is not working out. The most common situation is that the owner’s “heir-apparent” child does not possess all the qualities that the owner would like to see. In some cases, the concerns are valid. In other cases, the owner is being overly-critical. Regardless, owners whose heir-apparent isn’t “just so” undergo a great deal of emotional turmoil as they grapple with “what to do”.
  12. Can’t figure out how to be “fair” to everyone, including: children, spouses, employees, etc.

 

Fear and other emotional distresses play huge roles in a business owner’s decisions near the end of their runway. It’s common for the owner to vocalize a “rational” reason (like #6) to others, while concealing the true reason. The sad and unfortunate truth is that many business owners never work up the courage to face the true source of their distress. They simply avoid the situation entirely until they are forced from the business by some health-related factor. Businesses rarely survive that situation.

Question for the Crowd: Do you have personal experience dealing with an owner who stuck their head in the sand near the end of their runway? We would love to hear your story! Tell us what your role was (employee, child, spouse, etc.) and what you think the owner was avoiding. Is there anything you could have done to help the situation?  Please comment below or send an email to marketing@epiphanylaw.com (Re: Head in the sand) and we will post your comments anonymously.

Business Owners: There’s No Time Like the Present

The biggest asset for many small business owners is the value of their business and they count on it for retirement funds. However, most of those owners do not actually know the value of the business. How will they know when they can stop working or what to expect in retirement?

Having the information needed to prepare adequately for retirement is just one of the many benefits to a business valuation. Here are several others:

  • Increase value. In life, what is measured improves – this applies equally to business valuation.
  • Capital infusion. To raise money on the right terms you need to know your value.
  • Mergers & Acquisitions. You need certainty on your value to properly negotiate a deal.
  • Exit of an Owner. The more you understand the value, the more likely you will be to reach an amicable split.
  • Too often people guess or estimate and one side or the other losses.
  • Tax strategies. Good tax and financial planning requires beginning with good data. The best plan in the world won’t do you much good if the initial assumptions about value of your assets was wrong.
  • Employee incentive programs. Companies with employee incentive plans may want or need to share value information each year with employees.
  • Insurance planning. Many small businesses do not have adequate insurance coverage. In order to get adequate coverage, you need to know how much value you are covering.

Many business owners avoid valuation because traditionally it has involved an extensive, expensive, and invasive process. Epiphany Law is different and our technology has changed the process. Now we can provide a valuation report that costs a fraction of the traditional model and takes a fraction of the time.

To get started on your business valuation, simply go to https://epiphanylaw.bizequity.com/.