Does Your Company Have a Return to Work Strategy?

Article co-written and researched by attorneys Tracy Melvin and Alexis Merbach.

Many businesses are still figuring out how to manage HR issues in a pandemic. They are following the changes in every order and stimulus/relief package passed, and effectively rolling with the punches. Among the confusion and uncertainty, they have found ways to persevere. However, as states and cities now start to reopen—in turn allowing businesses to do the same—there is one question that remains…is the business prepared to get back to work?

There are several policies to consider as a business reopens. Some policies may not be new to the organization and likely are already be in place. Regardless, now is a great time to dust them off. Having correct policy documentation in place is crucial to ensuring the organization is proactively approaching and appropriately responding to the impact of COVID-19.

Businesses should draft or update the following policies as they work to reopen their doors:
  • Telework – Have a clear policy that outlines expectations for remote workers.
  • Anti-harassment & discrimination – There have already been many stories of employees being treated differently because they have or suspect they may have contracted COVID-19. Ensuring anti-harassment and discrimination policies are in place can set expectations and help minimize any potential risk.
  • Reasonable accommodations – Have a policy in place detailing how you will engage in an interactive reasonable accommodation process.
  • Overtime – To combat any wage & hour issues, employers may want to consider a policy requiring overtime to be pre-approved.
  • “Off the Clock” Work – Considering some employees may still be furloughed, laid off, or on reduced-hour schedules, implementing an “off the clock” policy makes it clear that employees are prohibited from checking e-mail, making phone calls, etc. for free. Employees must be compensated for all time worked.
  • Safety – Document workplace safety measures, including policies for proper cleaning, protective equipment, and social distancing measures, that have been put in place to prevent spread of the virus.
  • Health & wellness – Draft policies related to any health questionnaire or temperature check process, including that any health information will be properly protected.
  • Leave – Consider implementing a temporary leave request policy related to the two paid leaves under Families First Coronavirus Response Act.

Drafting or updated workplace policies is a great first step; however, businesses need to ensure effective implementation of these new or updated policies.

There are a few ways to do so effectively:
  • Train supervisors and managers on current, updated, and new policies. This will ensure consistency across the management team and present a united front to employees.
  • Consider cross-training your workforce to accommodate employee absences.
  • Any new or updated policies should be communicated to employees to ensure compliance throughout the organization. Distribute current and updated policies, have employees sign an acknowledgement that they have reviewed, understand, and will adhere to the policies, and continue communication about policies regularly.

To learn more, make sure to watch the webinar below. If you have questions or would like assistance developing a strategy to reopen,  contact us here. 

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