Category: Business Law Blog

Tax Preparedness in a Sale of a Private Company

I recently had the opportunity to participate in a webcast with four amazing experts on the topic of Business and Tax Preparedness in a Sale of a Private Company.  My fellow experts, Louis Vlahos, Cynthia Romano, Vanita Spaulding and Alex Kasdan were specialists in investment banking, business valuation, restructuring and process improvement and tax law – I was asked on as the corporate law expert.

The focus of the program was how to maximize the value of your business in a sale context.  What was amazing to me was the remarkable underlying consistency of all of the experts in one key area – the time to start preparing for a sale is long before an offer comes along.

Each expert, from the tax lawyer to the process improvement expert was convinced that the only real way to maximize your businesses value was to conduct your business with the ultimate end goal – a transition – in mind.  Whether you are planning to sell your business today or not, there’s a good chance that you’ll get an unsolicited offer in the future – and the future might be sooner than you think.  So it’s critical to ensure that your business is ready to transact, even if you don’t have present plans.  For certain issues, like tax elections, the IRS might look back five years or more in time before deciding whether to honor your election.  For other critical items – like succession planning and talent development – you’ll need a long time to train your team to be ready to run your business.  And from a corporate law perspective, you certainly want to avoid contracts that might pay dividends today, but lock you into a bad deal for the future when a potential buyer comes along.

How then, can you make your company completely “transaction ready”?  While tax preparedness certainly plays a part, that’s a much longer question than we have time for here. There are a number of things to consider and explore.  So, watch out for an upcoming article with some ideas on how to get started with that. In the meantime, you can check out the full webcast here.

You can also contact us with any questions you may have. Our office phone number is 920-996-0000 or you can email us here.

 

Family Business Services

What’s going to happen to the family business?

Are you the owner of a family business? Then, you probably already know you face unique challenges that other companies don’t have to worry about. And, those challenges only grow more intense as you start thinking about an exit strategy.

More than 70% of businesses put on the market never sell.   That’s 70% of those put on the market, don’t sell.  And countless more businesses never even get listed but rather die quietly due to an owner’s unexpected death or illness.

Only 34% of family businesses survive to the 2nd generation.  That’s 2 out of 3 never successfully make it from mom and dad to the kids.  And only 14% of family businesses survive to the 3rd generation.

Why?  Simple:  Failure to properly plan for the succession of the business to a buyer/next generation and failure to plan for the successful exit of current owners.

Bottom line: Business owners wait too long to begin planning for this HUGE transition. It’s a major issue afflicting our society, and one that will only grow over the next decade as hundreds of thousands of baby boomers look to sell.

As we well know, the first step in solving any problem is recognizing there is one. In the case of the aging business owner, the simple act of talking openly with someone about exit planning can spark action. And action can mean the difference between a seamless transition at fair value or a disastrous failure. If you are a loving spouse, child, parent, friend or confidant of a business owner that is avoiding tackling exit planning for their business, this article is written for you. As this tsunami swells, it is critical that you – the child, the spouse or the close friend – assume a vital role: Starting the Conversation.

Whether you are the business owner, next in line for a business succession or simply a concerned loved one, here are some tips for starting the conversation :

  1. Have empathy. It’s the ability to understand someone else’s feelings, attitudes, and perspectives. The ability to “put yourself in someone else’s shoes”. Start by opening your mind to think about the situation exclusively from their side. Think about how they feel about their business. Think about the hours they put into it, the hard times they have endured, and the success they have achieved. Respect and embrace those thoughts, and keep them with you as you talk.
  2. Treat it like a business meeting. This is a BIG deal. Do not treat it as you would if you were talking about last weekend’s college football games. Don’t bring up in passing or with playful jests. Doing so diminishes the importance and may provide an avenue for the owner to continue avoiding the topic. Set aside time for this conversation, as you would with an important business matter. Ensure there are no distractions. Doing so will set the tone that it is a serious conversation. You words will instantly come across as more sincere and genuine.
  3. Prepare yourself. Come into it with a list of things you would like to say and questions you would like to ask. Mentally, have an open mind and be prepared to listen. Emotionally, try to remain neutral so they can express themselves completely.
  4. Understand your ideal outcome. The ideal outcome may be lightly different for everyone having this conversation, but it generally looks something like this:
    • You effectively express your own concern and love for this business owner.
    • You are able to ask a few questions.
    • You schedule a time to revisit the conversation at a later date (with more information, a 3rd party, after serious thought).
  5. Don’t be discouraged if they aren’t ready. It is very likely that they won’t be ready to open-up the first time you talk. Don’t be discouraged! Be respectful of their process for dealing with this, and focus on committing to another time to talk in the future (a couple weeks later). The business owner will probably think and process extensively over the next couple weeks, before coming to your next meeting much more prepared.
  6. Seek the help of a 3rd party — eventually. Not for the first meeting – you may risk blindsiding and/or offending the business owner. You want them to open up, not shut down. However, assuming an initial conversation went well, you may suggest having a 3rd party present for subsequent meetings in order to help facilitate discussion. Look for their most trusted advisor – whether a financial planner, banker, accountant or attorney. If they don’t have a most trusted advisor, look for a Certified Exit Planning Advisor (CEPA), as they have a deep understanding of common concerns, as well as strategies to move forward.
  7. Just do it. We all want to avoid having the difficult conversations – its human nature. Most will avoid it, ignore it, and make excuses not to do it. Be one of the few. You aren’t doing it for yourself, you’re doing it for someone you care about. Someone who is woefully unprepared. Someone who’s future happiness depends on you Starting the Conversation. Your choices will make the difference between implementing a successful exit or the destruction of a lifetime of work.

Thinking about the future can seem overwhelming. But, it doesn’t have to. At Epiphany Law, we partner with our clients and their families to help them find the best path forward. We are known for helping family business owners navigate complex issues and find innovative solutions. To learn more about how we can help your family business write its next chapter, call us at 920-996-0000 or contact us here.

SCAM ALERT: Payment Fraud Warning

It is no secret that schemes and scams designed to fraudulently separate you from your money abound.  Every day it seems we learn of new and creative ways criminals have devised to defraud innocent people. Sometimes the schemes are brand new, sometimes they are recycled.  Whether new or old, however, they can hurt the people who fall prey to them.

Recently, we have learned that banking institutions have seen increased activity surrounding a fraud scheme that has been around for a while.  You may be aware of this particular scheme, but we believe it can’t hurt to remind you to be vigilant and use best practices to protect yourself from fraud.

Here’s how the scam plays out.

You receive a fraudulent email or letter disguised as one of your current suppliers.  In the communication, the “supplier” informs you that they have recently changed their payment processes or their banking relationship and provides new wiring, ACH or other payment information to be used on all future orders.  The communication seems entirely legitimate, so you direct your accounting department to input the changes and your next payment is made accordingly.  Unfortunately, the criminals now have your money and it will be withdrawn from the account before you catch on and can get it back.

How you can protect yourself.

ALWAYS double-check directly with your suppliers BEFORE you change any information in your company’s payment system.  Make a phone call directly to a trusted contact at your supplier to confirm whether the communication and new payment instructions are legitimate or not.  A phone call to a direct contact is better than email.  Email can be hacked and/or redirected.  A phone call will take only minutes but will provide you with significant protection against scams.  It will also signal to your suppliers that you are vigilant and care about your relationship with them.

Long story short: Do NOT make any changes to how you pay your suppliers or vendors until you first confirm with them that the change of payment instruction is legitimate.

Fraudsters often target businesses, trying to steal money or personal information. Make sure your business is taking proper steps to avoid scams. Employee education and cyber security are paramount  for defending your business from fraud.

 

About the Author

Heather Macklin

Heather J. Macklin is an experienced corporate litigator. She has spent her legal career helping businesses and business owners find practical and economic resolutions to legal disputes. You can learn more about Heather here.

Partnering Together to Fight Breast Cancer

Pictured Above: Epiphany Law team at the Real Men Wear Pink Guest Bartending Event

I often say moving to northeast Wisconsin was one of the best decisions I’ve made. It has been a great place to raise my five boys, make a career and a home. There is a real partnership between the public and business community here and I am proud to be a member of both. Good corporate citizenship is important, that’s one of the reasons I was excited to participate in The Real Men Wear Pink campaign supporting northeast Wisconsin’s American Cancer Society (ACS).

Over the years, several of my friends, clients and employees have been affected by cancer. Research from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services tells us that 1 in 8 women will get breast cancer at one point in their lives.

Because of the donations given to the ACS, they can continue their important work. Here’s just a few examples of what they’ve accomplished so far.
  • $59M invested in breast cancer research grants
  • 5M free rides have been provided to treatment
  • 40K patients guided through the complex health care system by ACS patient navigators
  • 5M breast cancer patients were provided one-on-one support services

When I was approached to be one of the community leaders representing The Real Men Wear Pink campaign, I was glad for the chance to give back. I believe businesses and business owners need to have a collaborative partnership with their community. And, this campaign is a great example of what we can achieve when we work together for an important cause.

This community has been my home for over 25 years. I’m grateful the American Cancer Society is working to attack cancer from every angle and make our area an even better place to work and live.

Attorney Kevin Eismann

 

About the Author

Kevin Eismann is a business attorney and owner of Epiphany Law, LLC. Epiphany Law’s mission is to positively impact lives through education, empowerment and an innovative approach to solving problems. Kevin was proud to join the fight against breast cancer this past October and participate as one of the business community leaders in the Real Men Wear Pink Campaign.

Compliance with the Fair Labor Standards Act is Good Business

Have you heard about the Department of Labor’s latest rule change? In this week’s blog, Epiphany Law attorney Sarah Coenen breaks down what the Fair Labor Standards Act means for your business.

Q: Can a salaried employee be entitled to overtime pay?

A: In general, regardless of whether an employee is paid an hourly or salary rate, he or she may be entitled to overtime pay. The Department of Labor (“DOL”), however, created an exemption under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) allowing certain employees to be exempt from receiving overtime pay.

Q: How do you know if an employee is qualified for the exemption?

A: To qualify for this exemption, the employee must:

  1. be salaried, meaning that he or she is paid a predetermined and fixed salary not subject to reduction because of variations in the quality or quantity of the work performed;
  2. be paid at least a specified weekly salary level; and
  3. primarily perform executive, administrative, or professional duties, as defined in DOL regulations.

Q: How will the Department of Labor’s 2019 update affect the rule?

A: The update raises the annual standard salary level from $23,660 to $35,568. This equates to the weekly rate increasing from $455 to $684. Therefore, an employee must have an annual salary level above $35,568, to be exempt from receiving overtime pay.

Q: Does the DOL update affect highly compensated employees (HCEs)?

A: Yes, the rule also increases the total annual compensation level for highly compensated employees (“HCEs”) from $100,000 to $107,432. HCEs are employees whose primary duty includes office/non-manual work and who customarily/regularly perform one or more of the exempt duties of an executive, administrative, or professional employee. For example, an employee may qualify as an HCE if he or she customarily and regularly directs the work of two or more other employees, even though he or she does not meet all of the other requirements in the standard exemption test.

Q: Are employers allowed to use commissions and incentive pay toward the employee’s salary?

A: Yes, the rule allows employers to use nondiscretionary bonuses and incentive pay (including commissions) to satisfy no more than 10 percent of an employee’s salary in order to qualify that employee under the exemption.

Q: What happens if the employee has not earned enough in nondiscretionary bonuses and incentive payments to retain his or her exempt status?

A: Then, the rule allows for the employer to have a “catch-up” payment at the end of the 52-week period. If the employer does not make up the “shortfall” during that one pay period, the employee is entitled to any overtime pay earned during the previous 52-week period.

Q: When does the new rule go into effect?

A: The new rule goes into effect on January 1, 2020.

Q: Why does this matter for me?

A: If you have any employees who are receiving a salary rate, you will need to re-evaluate those employee classifications to ensure that your business is in compliance with the new Fair Labor Standards Act rules by January 1, 2020.

Epiphany Law attorney’s can help you make sure your business is protected. For more information, contact us here.

Employment and Compliance Attorney
Sarah Coenen

About the Author

Sarah M. Coenen is an experienced business attorney with Epiphany Law. She focuses her practice on employment services including non-competition agreements, employee handbooks, compliance, hiring and termination. Sarah enjoys educating and empowering her clients to help them achieve their personal and business goals. You can learn more about Sarah’s background here.

Before You Hire a Lawyer, Answer these 4 Questions

The life of a business owner or business executive is typically filled with big decisions. And no decisions loom larger than whom to work with. Working with the right people will propel your business forward, while making the wrong hire will negatively affect your company’s culture, efficiency and ultimately, your bottom line.

Hiring the right lawyer is just as important as hiring the right employees, and when you’re hiring a lawyer to represent your business interests, there’s a lot to consider.

As a General Counsel to multiple companies, I’ve hired a lot of lawyers.  I’ve made some great decisions, and some that I’d rather not think about too much… But here are four questions that I found helpful when I was hiring outside legal counsel for the companies I worked for.

1. How well does the lawyer communicate?

A lawyer’s communication skills, more than anything else, will positively or negatively impact your relationship.  If you and your lawyer can’t communicate well – for whatever reason, be it style or substance, your relationship will be a failure.  Whomever you select needs to have superior communication skills and understand the importance in building a solid client-attorney relationship.   And, they need to be able to communicate however you like to communicate – be it over the phone, in person, email or text – you’re the client. And, they need to be able to adapt to your style or the relationship will be a failure. Before you hire a lawyer, you’ll want to make sure your communication styles are a good fit.

2. What is the lawyer’s style?

Are they aggressive?  Deliberate?  Inquisitive?  What is their risk tolerance?  In order to make informed decisions, you need to hear and embrace opposing viewpoints. But, you won’t have a good relationship with a lawyer whose style differs greatly from your own – that will only lead to frustration and confusion.  In particular, finding a lawyer who understands your risk tolerance is a key to being on the same page, but don’t underestimate other “personality” driven factors as well.

3. What is their experience level?

Assuming you’ve found a lawyer you “click” with, now it’s time to get into substance.  Ask yourself if you need a generalist or a specialist?  Are you looking for a long-term partner that can understand and work with your business on a variety of issues, or a specialist that can help fix a significant, pressing issue that you’d already identified?  Both can be business-savvy partners. But, you’ll want to make sure the lawyer you hire has significant experience in the role you’re looking to fill.

4. What is the best type of service agreement and fee schedule for my company?

There’s a lot of options for procuring legal counsel, and there are no right or wrong answers here. Here are four common solutions.

  • Hourly rate – probably the most common attorney fee arrangement on the list. The lawyer will track his or her time in fractions of an hour (usually six minute increments) and bill accordingly. These kinds of arrangements may result in a mis-match of incentives, since your lawyer gets paid more the longer they take, which is why other fee arrangements are gaining popularity.
  • Flat retainer agreement – This payment structure is ideal for businesses that have on-going legal needs, and the retainer can cover almost all your legal needs, or only specific subjects, like employment law. Having a dedicated attorney on-call will help you reduce risk and stop legal disputes before they even begin. It is often the most cost-effective way to procure convenient, expert legal assistance.
  • Flat fees – this is more common with attorneys who handle large volumes of a specific kind of case. Flat fees may be offered for will preparations, tenant evictions, mortgage foreclosures and more – each individual matter is a fixed fee, no matter how long it takes. Flat legal fees can be an attractive solution, but keep in mind litigation will almost never fall into this category.
  • Risk Sharing– most people have heard of contingency fees in litigation, where a lawyer might get 30 percent of 40 percent of the recovery if the client wins, but nothing if the client loses. However, they are gaining in popularity for other kinds of matters as well.  For instance, many firms will handle a merger or an acquisition on a similar arrangement, taking a smaller fee if the deal fails to close, and a larger fee if the deal is successful.  These types of fees help to align the lawyer’s incentive with your own.

Once you decide on the best fit for your company, it’s critical to make sure to clarify expectations. Ultimately, the client is in charge and the client-attorney relationship works best when there is a clear understanding about services rendered and the associated costs.

To learn more about how to hire a lawyer, contact us here.

How to Hire a Lawyer – About the Author

Lawyer Rob Macklin

 

Rob is a business attorney with Epiphany Law. He has over 20 years of experience offering businesses top-notch legal service and practical, actionable advice. Rob has served as General Counsel to several successful companies, ranging from $5 million to $1 billion in global revenue. In addition, Rob took time from his legal career to serve with the US Navy as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom, running intelligence operations for SEAL Team 8. As a trained lawyer, small business owner and Department of Defense certified interrogator, Rob’s diverse skill set can help you navigate any challenge your business may face.

Business Owners : Limit Financial Stress in 4 Simple Steps

By now, most of us understand how harmful stress can be to the body. It affects your heart health, breathing, muscles and even your brain function. But, according to the American Psychological Association, 26 percent of U.S. adults report feeling stressed about money most or all the time. And, for the average business owner, the stats around stress are even more surprising. Small business owners report that managing their business is at least 4 times more stressful than raising children.

One of the best things you can do to protect yourself from stress is to take a more proactive approach to your long-term planning. It’s been said that procrastination breeds stress and when it comes to finances, that’s certainly true. To help minimize stress, it’s essential to think about the long term.

Step 1 – Get a Trust-Based Estate Plan for Business Owners

As a business owner, you’ll have unique needs when it comes to estate planning. Proper estate planning is important in order to:

  • Provide continuity for the business, its other owners, and employees
  • Ensure adequate liquidity to enable transitions due to disability or death
  • Minimize transfer, gift, estate and income taxes
  • Reduce costs and burdens associated with settling affairs
  • Provide protection for the Business Owner’s spouse and family
  • Maximize likelihood that intended legacy is achieved

If you do not currently have an estate plan, or you simply have a will, you will need to take action. To protect your business and your own best interest, it’s important that you get a trust-based plan. Your will indicates who you want to have access to your assets, and how you want your assets distributed, but it does not keep your family out of Court. No one wants to go through Probate if they can avoid it. A trust-based plan allows your family to access your assets in the event you become incapacitated or pass away.

Step 2 – Get a Valuation

Understanding the value of your business is critical for proper business planning and achieving personal goals. Completing a Valuation on a regular basis allows you to manage and measure value growth. A quality report will also list your value drivers – the items on which you should focus to achieve value growth.  Even if you’re not considering exiting your business for years, knowing that the value of your business is the amount someone will pay for your business, will keep your end goal in mind.

Step 3 – Get a Succession Plan

Business succession planning is necessary for any business owner, especially those close to retirement. And, it is something you don’t want to put off. Planning ahead can help ensure you don’t leave money on the table. The vast majority of small business owners in the United States are never able to monetize the value of their business.  In other words, they are never able to “transition” their business successfully. Business owners can help avoid this problem with a well-designed business succession plan.

Step 4 – Consider a Business Succession Trust

If you have a transferable business with value, you will want to consider a Business Succession Trust. One of the key benefits of trusts is tax avoidance, specifically the federal estate tax. Another important benefit is creditor protection. Trusts can be used to shield the family and spouse from creditors or business-related debt.

Benjamin Franklin once said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” That’s a good way to think about financial planning for the business owner. If you take some time to think about your long-term financial goals and your legacy now, you can avoid complications, like probate, in the future.

For more information, call Epiphany Law at 920-996-000 and we can set up a time to assist you with the estate planning process. Or, contact us here.

About the Author

Kevin Eismann, Business Law Attorney

Kevin L. Eismann brings a unique, multi-point perspective to his clients because he is a business owner, Certified Exit Planning Advisor, as well as an attorney. Kevin enjoys building comprehensive strategies with his clients that allow them to reach their personal and business goals. Kevin has provided business owners practical, cost-effective solutions for over 20 years.

Three Common Myths about HR and the Attorney’s Role

Most people understand the attorney-client privilege is a rule that protects the confidentiality of communications between lawyers and clients. This rule encourages transparency and allows an attorney to provide effective representation. But, not everyone understands that there are limitations and that the rule may be applied differently depending on a specific situation.

The attorney-client privilege rule can be especially complex in the world of human resources. There are some common misconceptions among employers. The following can help clear up some of the confusion.

Myth Since the head of our HR department happens to be an attorney, any of her notes from internal investigations will be protected.

Reality – Not exactly. Employers sometimes believe that having an attorney as the head of their HR department will protect their internal investigations from being disclosed. However, the privilege only applies to confidential communications between attorneys and their clients made for the specific purpose of obtaining or providing legal advice. This rule can not be applied to documents that were created in order to comply with a company’s policy or procedure. So, there is a chance that internal documents prepared by the HR department may be disclosed during litigation procedures.

Myth – My company has taken the appropriate steps to ensure that HR issues within the company will not become public knowledge.

Reality –Probably not. While thorough planning is essential and can certainly help limit your company’s liability, it still can’t guarantee that any documents created during an internal investigation will remain private. You’ll want to keep that in mind while creating all communications. Information from interviews that took place during a discrimination or harassment investigation could very well be considered ‘discoverable’ should there be a subsequent lawsuit.

Myth – Since my company has invested in knowledgeable and experienced HR professionals, hiring an outside attorney is unnecessary.

Reality – The best way to protect against legal claims is to hire a lawyer. Employers should keep in mind that discrimination and harassment suits are on the rise. But, when you hire an attorney for the specific purpose of providing legal counsel surrounding HR concerns, then all those communications between your company and lawyer would not be allowed to be disclosed.

The relationship between an employee and employer is heavily regulated and often difficult to navigate. Employment attorneys can help make sure you are in compliance with state and federal laws and often stop matters from escalating. To learn more about how an attorney can help protect your company’s best interest, visit https://epiphanylaw.com/contact-us/

Sarah Coenen, Employment Attorney

About the Author

Sarah M. Coenen is an experienced business attorney with Epiphany Law. She focuses her practice on employment services including: non-competition agreements, employee handbooks, hiring and termination. Sarah enjoys educating and empowering her clients to help them achieve their personal and business goals.

Key Benefits of Outsourced General Counsel

Put simply, Outsourced General Counsel is an extension of your team. Like an in-house general counsel, an outsourced general counsel is a business’ chief lawyer or legal advisor. And other than the fact they don’t typically work ON the premises of your business, an outsourced general counsel really owns the same duties and responsibilities of an in-house counsel. Those duties and responsibilities include (but are not limited to) the identification and oversight of all legal issues across the company and its various departments, as well as the provision of key advice to the business’ key decision-maker

This proactive approach to the law solves business’ needs  by providing a cost-effective solution. It’s a way to have an experience closer to the in-house model while also getting a broader knowledge base.

Some of the key reasons to consider outsourcing your general counsel include:

  • Fixed Budget and No Surprise Legal Bills – your business’ legal budget for next year does not need to be a guess. When outsourcing your general counsel, you know, with certainty, what you will spend next year on legal services.
  • Responsive Service – Your outsourced general counsel will become an integral part of your team. Fr example, contracts can be reviewed before signed, HR questions can be discussed, and HR policies would always be up to date in one flat rate.
  • Proactive Risk Management – Imagine having your attorney on speed dial, for answers to issues before they become problems. Imagine being proactive rather than reactive. Being proactive ultimately saves time and money.

Typically clients who utilize these services develop a close relationship with one attorney but have access to all attorneys in the firm to handle specialized needs. The close relationship ensures priority service and the backing of the firm ensures broader expertise.

An outsourced general counsel will protect your company and ensure your business is staying on the right side of the law.

If you have questions or would like to learn more, you can contact us here. 

 

About the Author

Attorney Kevin Eismann

Kevin Eismann

Kevin is the founding partner at Epiphany Law, LLC. He enjoys building comprehensive strategies with his clients that allow them to reach their personal and business goals. Kevin has been providing business owners practical, cost effective solutions since for over 20 years.

 

Reasons to Outsource Your General Counsel

Put simply, Outsourced General Counsel is an extension of your team. Like an in-house general counsel, an outsourced general counsel is a business’ chief lawyer or legal advisor. And other than the fact they don’t typically work ON the premises of your business, an outsourced general counsel really owns the same duties and responsibilities of an in-house counsel. Those duties and responsibilities include (but are not limited to) the identification and oversight of all legal issues across the company and its various departments, as well as the provision of key advice to the business’ key decision-maker

Outsourced general counsel services solves business’ needs  by providing a cost-effective solution way to have an experience closer to the in-house model while also getting a broader knowledge base.

Some of the key reasons to consider outsourcing your general counsel include:

  • Fixed Budget and No Surprise Legal Bills – your business’ legal budget for next year does not need to be a guess. When outsourcing your general counsel, you know, with certainty, what you will spend next year on legal services.
  • Responsive Service – Your outsourced general counsel will become an integral part of your team. Fr example, contracts can be reviewed before signed, HR questions can be discussed, and HR policies would always be up to date in one flat rate.
  • Proactive Risk Management – Imagine having your attorney on speed dial, for answers to issues before they become problems. Imagine being proactive rather than reactive. Being proactive ultimately saves time and money.

Typically clients who utilize Epiphany Law’s outsourced general counsel services develop a close relationship with one attorney but have access to all attorneys in the firm to handle specialized needs. The close relationship ensures priority service and the backing of the firm ensures broader expertise.

An outsourced general counsel will protect your company and ensure your business is staying on the right side of the law.